Sample Disney World Vacation Plans

Planning a vacation in Disney World can be more involved than planning a trip to Europe, because in addition to the getting there you have to decide which parks to visit, shows to see and restaurants; there are so many choices and the most popular attractions book up very quickly. WDW Prep School advises Disney World visitors to first decide on how many people are traveling (and their ages), length of the trip, how you’ll be getting to the park and when, choice of hotel and your budget.



Budget, Moderate and Deluxe Trips

Not everyone can afford to stay at a Disney luxury resort, but there are plenty of fine accommodations and amenities in other price ranges. A budget trip example for two adults and two kids under age 10 during an off-season week could include a stay at a Value Resort, most basic park tickets and eating at inexpensive restaurants. This would cost about $4000 to $5000 without transportation to the park.


A moderate-priced Disney World trip would cost about $5500 to $6500 for two adults and two kids, but during a moderately busy time. It could include staying at a Moderate Resort, park tickets with the Park Hopper option, one special event (like a character dinner) and eating at half Quick Service and half Table Service restaurants. Some of the high-end restaurants have incredible food, but the costs of those add up quickly.


A deluxe Disney trip would probably cost at least $9000, especially if you go there during the peak busy times (Christmas, for example). This might include a stay at one of their Deluxe resorts, park tickets with the Park Hopper Plus, two special events and eating at Table Service Restaurants most of the time. Keep in mind that whether you decide to go all out or take a budget trip, it’s easy to find discounts during the booking process.


A Sample Disney World Trip

Reading about how other people spend their time on Disney World trips can be very helpful if you’re trying to plan one of your own. All American Alliance shares a 7-day itinerary that covers a lot of what there is to do at the theme park.


Day one is spent at Hollywood Studios, with stops at Galaxy’s Edge and Toy Story Land and a meal at Sci Fi Dine. The following day is set aside for Magic Kingdom, with Cinderella’s Royal Table for a character breakfast, Space Mountain, It’s a Small World and fireworks at night.


Try the Animal Kingdom on the third day, which is more low-key than Magic Kingdom. The newer Pandora, World of Avatar shouldn’t be missed, nor should the Kilimanjaro Safari or Rivers of Light show. There’s some great restaurants here too, like the Tusker House and Flame Tree BBQ.


Day four can be reserved for a day of rest, and you can spend this time enjoying the amenities at your hotel. While some people disagree with resting for a day when you're at Disney, it’s actually a great way to recharge your batteries. Take a leisurely swim in the pool or enjoy on-resort activities; after all, you’re paying for it!



The next day can be spent at Epcot, and as with the other parks it’s best to get there early. Start at Future World, and be sure to check out the Spaceship Earth, Test Track and Mission Space rides. Get a Fastpass for the Frozen Ever After ride; the food options are endless and some of the top choices are San Angel Inn and and Teppan Edo.


Head to a Water Park/Disney Springs for the sixth day. Hit Blizzard Beach or Typhoon Lagoon in the morning, and Disney Springs for dinner, a movie, a virtual reality experience or bowling. And if you have enough energy left, you can return to one of the parks for your final day; Magic Kingdom is a good choice.